Vaccine Fact Check

three people check facts to address incorrect vaccine information

Learn more about false vaccine information and what to do about it. Find more information about false vaccine information and how to address it in AIM’s Vaccine Confidence toolkit.

There are three different kinds of false information:

Misinformation

Information that is false, but not created with the intention of causing harm.

Fact Check!

Sharing a story on Facebook that you later learn is false is an example of spreading misinformation. Consider the following questions in your search for the truth:

  • Is the claim believable or realistic?
  • Is this a well-known news organization or website?

Disinformation

Information that is false and deliberately created to harm a person, social group, organization, or country.

Fact Check!

Sharing a story on facebook that you know is false is an example of spreading disinformation. Consider the following questions:

  • Do they have sources for their information?
  • Is the same information available from a trusted outlet?
  • Is the author real and reliable?

Malinformation

Information that is based on reality and used to inflict harm on a person, organization, or country.

Fact Check!

Malinformation can come in the form of harassment or hate speech, and target people because of their history or group (i.e., race or religion). Consider the following questions:

  • Did it happen recently? (Check for a date)
  • Does it appeal to your emotions?
  • Is bias clouding your judgement?

What can I do to find credible vaccine information?

Fact check claims you see on social media or in online articles to verify whether or not they are true.

  • Use reputable sources to fact-check information.

Reputable sources

Download the Infographic

This iREACH infographic describes three different kinds of false information and explains how to fact check information.

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