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INTRODUCTION
The AIM Adult Immunization Resource Guide characterizes a selection of the varied activities and strategies that Immunization Programs have employed to enhance and improve the delivery of immunizations to adults. Each of the nine chapters offer a menu of adult-focused strategies that Immunization Programs can adopt, adapt, or use as inspiration in planning or brainstorming exercises. Recognizing that Immunization Programs vary substantially in the resources available for adult immunization efforts and in their public health infrastructure, the Resource Guide offers activities at three levels: 

       



CHAPTER 1: ENGAGING THE PUBLIC

By engaging the public, Immunization Programs have the opportunity to increase adults’ understanding of the risks of vaccine-preventable disease and the benefit of recommended vaccines. The highlighted activities related to engaging the public are:

Getting Started: Collaborating with a statewide immunization coalition as a resource efficient way to develop public education materials (Arizona)

Moving Forward: Using existing connections to conduct outreach via presentations to community groups (Arkansas)

Taking It to the Next Level: Creating a dedicated staff role for communicating with providers and the public through both traditional and new media routes (Philadelphia)

 

      
 

 


CHAPTER 2: ENGAGING PROVIDERS

Immunization Programs play a major role in educating providers regarding the need to assess adult patients’ vaccination status and to recommend the appropriate vaccines based on age group, risk status, and job type, as well as encouraging providers themselves be vaccinated. The highlights related to engaging providers are:

Getting Started: Creating a visual, one-page guide to clarify recent changes in national recommendations for pneumococcal vaccines (Oregon)

Moving Forward: Collaborating with other stakeholders to require influenza vaccination for health care workers (Rhode Island)

Taking It to the Next Level: Conducting a multi-faceted education campaign to promote conversations between providers and adult patients (New Hampshire)

           

      
 

 


CHAPTER 3: PARTNERSHIPS FOR REACHING UNINSURED ADULTS

Immunization Programs can improve access to vaccines for the uninsured by partnering with organizations that serve this population, such as public clinics. The highlighted activities related to reaching the uninsured are:

Getting Started: Collating information on patient assistance programs (PAPs) offered by pharmaceutical companies to help community health centers vaccinate uninsured adults (Rhode Island)

Moving Forward: Working with community health centers to identify quality improvements to support adult vaccination, including electronic health record enhancements (Chicago)

Taking It to the Next Level: Creating a program to provide publicly-purchased vaccine at no cost to safety net providers for administration to uninsured adults (Texas)

      
 

 

CHAPTER 4: REACHING ADULTS WHERE THEY LIVE

Immunization Programs can support adult immunization through community based outreach with groups such as faith-based organizations, and partnerships with organizations with resident populations (e.g., universities, long-term care facilities). The highlighted activities related to reaching adults where they live are:

Getting Started: Utilizing existing experience working with faith-based organizations to help develop easily understandable materials for community groups to use to conduct their own flu prevention workshops (Arkansas)

Moving Forward: Conducting a competitive campaign on university and college campuses to promote flu vaccination among students (Michigan)

Taking It to the Next Level: Forming a partnership with the Department of Corrections to develop an immunization infrastructure and culture for vaccinating the prison population (Oregon)

      
 

  CHAPTER 5: REACHING ADULTS WHERE THEY WORK

Immunization Programs can support workplace vaccination, including for health care workers, through initiatives that encourage employers to promote vaccination and offer on-site vaccine clinics. The activities highlighted here related to reaching adults where they work are:

Getting Started: Working with an outside organization to assist with its pilot program to promote worksite vaccination campaigns (Arizona)

Moving Forward: Conducting targeted site visits of long-term care facilities to assess employee and resident vaccination, and promote participation in the statewide immunization registry (Utah)

Taking It to the Next Level: Providing funding to local health departments to support their efforts to conduct employer outreach and worksite clinics (Utah)

 
      
 

 
  CHAPTER 6: PARTNERING WITH PHARMACISTS

Immunization Programs can strengthen pharmacy engagement in providing adult vaccines by partnering with local pharmacy associations, schools of pharmacy, and state/ local pharmacy boards, as well as medical societies. The collaborative network among pharmacies, the community, and the immunization program can be used to address policy barriers and strengthen communication. The highlighted activities related to partnering with pharmacists are:

Getting Started: Expanding pharmacists’ authority to vaccinate and requiring pharmacists to report to the state immunization information system (IIS) (Louisiana)

Moving Forward: Determining pharmacist-specific barriers to IIS reporting and using this knowledge to tailor education and training materials, with the help of a pharmacist immunization champion (Washington)

Taking It to the Next Level: Determining the immunization-related educational needs of pharmacists and developing a multi-pronged education plan (Minnesota)
      
 

 
 

CHAPTER 7: PROMOTING VACCINATION OF PREGNANT WOMEN

Immunization Programs can promote the vaccination of pregnant women through both provider and patient education initiatives. The highlighted activities related to promoting vaccination of pregnant women are:

Getting Started: Creating a poster, to highlight the reasons for pregnant women to receive Tdap and influenza vaccines (Idaho)

Moving Forward: Collaborating with birthing hospitals to develop cocooning policies, procedures, and provider education materials (Nevada)

Taking It to the Next Level
: Conducting a multi-faceted provider awareness campaign, including the use of internal department expertise to guide content and geographic target areas (Texas)

      
 

 
 

CHAPTER 8: VACCINATING HIGH-RISK ADULTS

Immunization Programs can expand education and outreach to high-risk adults by working with a variety of partners, including public clinics (e.g., community health centers), other divisions within their own health department (e.g., sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis control), and local health departments. The activities highlighted here related to vaccinating high-risk adults are:

Getting Started: Providing 317-funded vaccines to a local health department that uses them for community outreach to vulnerable seniors (Nevada)

Moving Forward: Providing funding and training support to two community health centers serving a large Hispanic/Latino population to develop a customized quality improvement plan to improve adult flu and Tdap vaccine coverage rates (Washington)

Taking It to the Next Level: Conducting a multi-faceted project to support hepatitis B vaccination of high-risk adults, which includes working with multiple partners who serve this population and the use of surveillance data to help target outreach efforts (New York City)

        
 

 
 

CHAPTER 9: USING IIS TO EXPAND ADULT VACCINATIONS 

Immunization Programs can work toward expanding adult vaccinations using IIS through efforts to increase the number of providers reporting to IIS and by developing tools using IIS data that promote complete and accurate data reporting. The highlighted activities related to using IIS to expand adult vaccinations are:

Getting Started: Supporting provider demand for Meaningful Use certification by allowing adult providers who do not participate in the state vaccine program to report to the IIS (Idaho) 

Moving Forward: Adding vaccine coverage measures for selected adult vaccines in the IIS as options for benchmark reporting (Iowa)

Taking It to the Next Level: Creating county-level, IIS-based “report cards” of coverage level data for select vaccine measures across the lifespan, in part to motivate local health departments to improve their adult immunization coverage rates (Michigan)

        
 

 This Resource Guide was made possible through support from Pfizer Inc.


 
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